Politics, Irish

One final round of photos, a supplement to the previous post.

Some Historic Cartoons

Political Commemoration in the Republic of Ireland

Republican Jesus in Dingle.

At Kilmalkedar Church: the grave of Thomas Russell, Irish Volunteers.

Translation of the above.

Already featured: a memorial to Thomas Ashe (1885-1917), member of the Gaelic League, the Irish Republican Brotherhood, and the Irish Volunteers, and namesake of the Dingle GAA grounds. 

Heroes of 1916 on a building in Belfast.

A manhole cover featuring Eamonn Bulfin, participant in the Easter Rising and ambassador of the Irish Republic to Argentina.

Garden of Remembrance, O’Connell Street, Dublin.

Memorial to President Erskine Childers, son of the author and revolutionary Robert Erskine Childers, in St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin.

Memorial to Douglas Hyde, founder of the Gaelic League and first president of Ireland, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin.

The famous General Post Office in Dublin.

Amazingly, the building is still in use as a post office! (Although there is a display on the Easter Rising in the building.)

The Irish Republic flag does not fly over the GPO, but only that of the postal service (An Post).

Derry/Londonderry

“Hands Across the Divide” statue.

Peace mural, Bogside.

In the Bogside, Derry

The iconic image of Bloody Sunday, rendered as a mural. Fr. Edward Daly, future bishop of Derry, waves a blood-stained white handkerchief as a truce flag, in attempting to escort a mortally wounded protestor to safety.

“The Petrol Bomber,” depicting a participant in the Battle of the Bogside.

Civil rights activist Bernadette Devlin, with people wielding trash can lids (either as shields, or to bang on the ground to warn people of the arrival of police or army patrols).

“Free Derry Corner,” depicting the Republican Easter Lily (green, white, and orange) in memory of the Easter Rising, with “Free Tony Taylor” sign in the background.

Nelson Mandela and Bobby Sands, with “INLA” graffiti.

Civil Rights mural.

I don’t know who any of these people are.

Civil Rights material in the Museum of Free Derry.

Was “William” crossed out because the street was named after King William III? I wouldn’t rule it out!

Fountain Estate, Londonderry

The residents of the Fountain Estate, a small loyalist enclave near the Bogside, have their own propaganda.

Note the red, white, and blue kerbstones and lamp post, marking loyalist turf.

A new direction in murals – many of them aren’t painted, but made on a computer and printed out.

Falls Road, Belfast: a Catholic, Nationalist, and Republican Area

Probably the most famous mural of them all, Bobby Sands on the side of Sinn Fein headquarters.

Kieran Nugent, first “Blanket man.”

Séan MacDiarmada, executed for his role in the Easter Rising of 1916.

Republican heroes past and present.

The Easter Rising, Constance Markievicz writing prison letters, Blanket Protestors, and the Hunger Strikers, including Frank Stagg, who died in England in 1976

There’s commentary on this one at Extramural Activity.

Commentary on this one can be found at thetroubles.omeka.net.

A reaction to the royal wedding? He didn’t listen!

Garden of Remembrance to the D Company, IRA Belfast Brigade.

Expressions of Common Cause on the Falls Road

From the Eileen Hickey Republican History Museum, Belfast

Republican pins.

Republican prisoners could occupy themselves by making models of Celtic crosses, round towers, and harps, some actually functional. The Free Derry Museum boasts one by Martin McGuinness himself.

Republican Plot, Milltown Cemetery, Falls Road, Belfast

Shankill, Belfast: A Protestant, Unionist, and Loyalist Area

If the republicans hearken back to the Easter Rising and War of Independence, loyalists remember their service in the First and Second World Wars. Poppies, not lilies, are the flowers in question.

The only “1916” celebrated on the Shankill Road is the Battle of the Somme.

Memorial to three important members of the Ulster Volunteer Force, its name a deliberate reference to the Ulster Volunteers of 1912, and the UVF’s associated “Red Hand Commando” unit.

I don’t know who exactly these people are and I don’t think I want to.

When marching in July, Protestants require music, usually provided by fife and drum corps.

A massive bonfire under construction, to be set on July 12.

Between the Two Communities

The Peace Wall.

Gate on the Peace Wall, still shut at night.

Unionist Propaganda from the Ulster Museum and Belfast City Hall Museum

The revolutionaries of 1916 were not the only ones to declare a provisional government: Ulster Volunteers threatened to do the same thing in 1913.

It’s interesting when unionists reach back into Irish history to find inspirational examples for themselves today. They claim that Ulster has always been culturally different from the rest of the island.  Apparently they admire St. Patrick too – he’s not just an Irish and Catholic figure.

This poster dates from before the reduction of “Ulster” from nine counties to six.

Poster against the proposed Council of Ireland, part of the failed Sunningdale Agreement (1974).

Wikipedia: “Ulster Says No was the name and slogan of a unionist mass protest campaign against the provisions of the 1985 Anglo-Irish Agreement which gave the government of the Republic of Ireland an advisory role in the governance of Northern Ireland.”

Amusing personifications of the four countries of the United Kingdom, all standing against Home Rule.

Wikipedia: “The Vanguard Unionist Progressive Party (VUPP), informally known as Ulster Vanguard, was a unionist political party which existed in Northern Ireland between 1972 and 1978. Led by William Craig, the party emerged from a split in the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and was closely affiliated with several loyalist paramilitary groups.” William Craig was apparently no relation to James Craig.

Belfast Today

Titanic Belfast museum, which has so far escaped bombing.